spring

spring vb 1 Spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem can mean to come up or out of something into existence.
Spring stresses sudden or surprising emergence especially after a period of concealment or hidden existence or preparation
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plants spring from seed

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thoughts that sprang up in his mind

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he had not chosen his course. It had sprung from a necessity of his nature— Brooks

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freedom of the mind, the basic freedom from which all other freedoms springDavis

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Arise emphasizes the fact of coming into existence or into notice more than the conditions attending the event; often it conveys no clear suggestion of a prior state
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a rumor arose and was widely circulated

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after Alfred no rival native house arose to dispute the throne with Alfred's heirs— Malone

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When used with from, however, it usually implies a causal connection between what is the object of the preposition and what is the subject of the verb; in such cases it is synonymous with result, though it neither loses nor obscures its primary implication of coming into existence
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mistakes often arise from ignorance

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the mischief arose from careless gossip

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the depression, the shock arising from what had happened abovestairs, left him almost at once— Bromfield

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Sometimes, when the context suggests a cause, the from phrase is omitted
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where there is continued discontent, trouble is certain to arise

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the right never existed, and the question whether it has been surrendered cannot ariseJohn Marshall

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Rise and arise (see also under RISE 2) are often used interchangeably, but usage usually favors arise except where, in addition to the implication of beginning, there is either in the word or the context a strong suggestion of ascent
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new nations rise only to fall

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mighty forces rise from small beginnings

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the Gothic cathedrals rose in England in the first half of the thirteenth century— Saunders

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great regimes rose, based upon the irrational and negative in man's nature— Straight

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Originate suggests a definite source or starting point which may be specified or located
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the theory of evolution did not originate with Darwin

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the fire originated in the basement

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the newsreel, originated ... in France, was introduced in the United States in 1910— Mott

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its founding originated in the Puritans' conviction that learning was essential for godliness— Murdock

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Derive also suggests a source; usually it does not imply, as originate implies, actual inception but presupposes a prior existence in another form or in another person or thing and connotes descent (as by inheritance, endowment, transference, or deduction)
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the power of the executive derives from the people

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our thoughts often derive from our wishes

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the principle of symmetry derives, I suppose, from contemplation of the human form— Binyon

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much of our thinking about the rights and duties of the citizen derives directly from Greco-Roman thought— Highet

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Flow, issue, emanate in common imply a passing from one thing to another, the former being the source from which the latter is derived. All of these words are colored by their basic meanings.
Flow suggests passage like water, easily as if from a spring or abundantly as if from a reservoir
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praise God, from whom all blessings flowKen

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the oleaginous sentences flowed easily from her pen— Gibbons

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Issue most frequently suggests emergence into existence, as if from a womb
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how far Arnold is responsible for the birth of Humanism would be difficult to say; we can at least say that it issues very naturally from his doctrine— T. S. Eliot

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if the naturalist's logic rests on wind, and issues in echoing phrases devoid of substance— Sullivan

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Emanate is used largely in reference to immaterial constructions (as a law, a principle, a power, or a system of thought); it connotes the passage of something impalpable or invisible and suggests a less obvious causal connection between the source and the thing derived than flow or issue
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but the house . . . was Carrie's and it was from her that emanated the atmosphere of a home— Purdy

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the government of the Union ... is, emphatically, and truly, a government of the people. In form and in substance it emanates from them— John Marshall

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Proceed stresses place of origin or, sometimes, parentage, derivation, or cause
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no public benefit which you receive but it proceeds or comes from them to you and no way from yourselves— Shak.

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assuring her that his seeming inattention had only proceeded from his being irivolved in a profound meditation— Peacock

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Stem suggests a growing out (as of a stem from a root or of a branch from a trunk) and is used chiefly in reference to things that come into existence through the influence of a predecessor either as a natural outgrowth or as a subordinate development
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the good portrait painters . . . stem from Rubens— Mather

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it spread to the lower officers and the troops in the field— or perhaps it stemmed from them— Shirer

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Analogous words: emerge, loom, *appear: *come, arrive: *begin, commence, start
2 *jump, leap, bound, vault
Analogous words: frolic, rollick, gambol, disport (see PLAY)
spring n 1 *motive, impulse, incentive, inducement, spur, goad
Analogous words: *origin, source, root, inception: *cause, determinant, antecedent: *stimulus, stimulant, excitant, incitement, impetus
2 jump, leap, bound, vault (see under JUMP vb)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Spring — Spring, n. [AS. spring a fountain, a leap. See {Spring}, v. i.] 1. A leap; a bound; a jump. [1913 Webster] The prisoner, with a spring, from prison broke. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. A flying back; the resilience of a body recovering its former… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spring — may refer to: * Spring (season), a season of the year * Spring (device), a mechanical part * Spring (hydrosphere), a natural source of waterArt* Spring (painting), an oil by Lawrence Alma Tadema * Spring , a painting by Christopher… …   Wikipedia

  • Spring — steht für: einen Bestandteil zahlreicher Ortsnamen in englischsprachigen Ländern, siehe Springfield (Ortsname), Spring Valley, Spring Hill oder Blue Spring eine Festmacherleine und die Springflut in der Seemannssprache Spring (Engine), ein Open… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Spring — (spr[i^]ng), v. t. 1. To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant. [1913 Webster] 2. To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a surprise on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spring — [spriŋ] vi. sprang or sprung, sprung, springing [ME springen < OE springan, akin to Du & Ger springen < IE * sprenĝh , to move quickly (< base * sper , to jerk) > Sans spṛhayati, (he) strives for] 1. to move suddenly and rapidly;… …   English World dictionary

  • Șpring — Gespreng Spring Hilfe zu Wappen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • SPRING — directs here, for other uses of the word, see Spring SPRING is GIS and remote sensing image processing system with an object oriented data model which provides for the integration of raster and vector data representations in a single environment …   Wikipedia

  • Spring — (spr[i^]ng), v. i. [imp. {Sprang} (spr[a^]ng) or {Sprung} (spr[u^]ng); p. p. {Sprung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Springing}.] [AS. springan; akin to D. & G. springen, OS. & OHG. springan, Icel. & Sw. springa, Dan. springe; cf. Gr. spe rchesqai to hasten.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spring — puede referirse a: Abreviatura científica del botánico Antoine Frédéric Spring 1814 1872. Spring Framework, un framework para desarrollo de aplicaciones Java. Spring, una banda británica de rock progresivo de los años 1970. Spring, único álbum de …   Wikipedia Español

  • şpring — ŞPRING, şpringuri, s.n. (mar.) Parâmă folosită pentru a ancora o navă (1). – var. (după alte surse) spring. – Din engl. spring. Trimis de cata, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DEX 98  şpring s. n., pl. şprínguri Trimis de siveco, 10.08.2004. Sursa …   Dicționar Român

  • spring — ► VERB (past sprang or chiefly N. Amer. sprung; past part. sprung) 1) move suddenly or rapidly upwards or forwards. 2) move suddenly by or as if by the action of a spring. 3) operate by or as if means of a spring mechanism: spring a trap. 4) (sp …   English terms dictionary

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